Trusting the Learning Process (Part One)

Children are born with a natural ability to learn. They are naturally curious, interactive, engaged, exploratory, and playful. They learn, amongst other things, to recognise their main care givers, they learn to crawl and walk, and they learn to feed themselves. They do all these things with the support from family members and without tuition.

The average four year old asks around 400 questions a day. Curiosity is etched into our DNA and does not diminish with age if allowed to proceed unhindered. As Unschoolers we trust that this in built drive to learn continues beyond compulsory school age, we accept and trust our children’s desire to discover more about the world around them, and we trust that our children are capable.

Each of our children has their own unique journey. Just like they each learn to walk and talk when they are ready, they will develop skills and interests according to their own paths. They will have their own pace and style and passions but they will all be compelled by the same desire to find out more.

We cannot control or guarantee what they are learning or when they learn it. They ultimately make their own connections. We can watch in wonder as their journeys unfold, we can join them on their journeys, we can watch their joy and watch them flourish and we can trust that they will learn in their own pace and timing. We can support and facilitate and partner them but ultimately their learning belongs to them.

It can be difficult for adults to step outside the conventional methods of schooling and understand how children learn without the widely accepted model of curriculums and teachers. Read Part Two to discover what learning can look like without school.

Published by heiditsteel

Teacher turned Unschooler: passionate about autonomous education and supporting our children's natural inclination towards learning through play.

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